10 Creative Yogurt Based Healthy Snacks

And, I remember when I ask for someone one of my closes, about their usual daily snacks. At the start of the list comes the packed, unhealthy names…

This discussion often leave me with so unhealthy stuff

And it’s not right.

So, I found Snack time doesn’t have to be unhealthy. There can be healthy and tasty ways of snacking for all. Here is my secret healthy ingredient to make healthy and portable nutrient-rich snacks that are a great low-calorie.

Yogurt is one of my favourite foods and so versatile. It’s creamy, delicious, healthy and comes in all sorts of flavours you can blend into a variety of snacks. It makes a healthy, filling snack any time of day. Greek yogurt has a thicker texture and more protein and probiotics.

Yogurt and yogurt-based snacks are quick and easy and I feel good continuing to eat them because the carbohydrates and protein keep them fueled through their various activities. Plus, it is an affordable, nutrient-rich snack that continues to support their growing muscles and bones.

1. Yogurt Tzatziki dip

Stir together plain yogurt, chopped cucumber, olive oil, minced garlic, salt, chopped fresh mint and chopped fresh thyme. Serve dip with pita bread or crunchy veggie sticks.

https://www.wholesomeyum.com/easy-greek-tzatziki-sauce-recipe/

2. Peanut butter Yogurt dip

Stir together peanut butter, vanilla yogurt and cinnamon for an easy peanut butter yogurt dip, pair it up with sliced banana or apple.

3. Yogurt Parfait

For rushed mornings, quick afternoon breaks, or pretty much any busy time at all, this combo is a no-brainer. Top yogurt with low-fat granola and fresh fruit and chopped nuts for a speedy snack.

4. Yogurt Pesto dip

Combine 1 ½ cups plain Greek yogurt with ½ cup pesto (homemade or store-bought, basic basil or variety of your choice), and mix until smooth. Pair it with roasted vegetables, whole wheat pasta or use as a dipping sauce for chicken, fish, or steak. Spread it on a sandwich, use it as a base for dressing — the possibilities are truly endless because this rockstar sauce goes with pretty much everything.

5. Guacamole

Tex-Mex lovers swear by this dip for creamy, tangy guacamole. Just add a dollop or two of Greek yogurt to your favourite guac recipe and wait for the rave reviews. Bonus: it helps stretch the avocados, for those times when unexpected (or super-hungry) guests show up.

Can check the recipe here :

https://www.justataste.com/creamy-greek-yogurt-guacamole-recipe/

6. Nutella Yogurt

Another easy spread. Add a spoonful of Nutella to a cup of plain Greek yogurt. Sweet, chocolaty, and full of protein — sounds like the perfect snack to us! You can use this mix as a dip for your favorite fruit, too.

7. Overnight Oats

Oats are usually eaten for breakfast (hence the name), but they’re a great snack anytime you need a protein boost. In a bowl, mix together rolled oats, Greek yogurt. After that, the sky’s the limit — add nut butter, seeds, honey or maple syrup, cinnamon, fresh or dried fruit, granola, or even chocolate chips for some flavor and texture. Cover the mixture and let it sit in the fridge overnight or for a few hours until the oats begin to soften.

8. Frozen Yogurt-Covered Berries

Stay cool with these frozen snacks. Dunk pieces of fresh fruit in Greek yogurt (hint: skewering small berries with a toothpick makes it less messy) and spread out on a baking sheet. Store in the freezer for 15 minutes or until hard. This works with any variety of berries.

9. Fruit Yogurt Popsicles

A homemade version of that store-bought yogurt popsicle, but so much healthier, made with your own blend of favorite fruit and yogurt.

Can check the recipe:

https://www.theidearoom.net/yogurt-fruit-and-granola-popsicles/

10. Spinach-Power Smoothie

Refuel your tiring evening with this smoothie full of calcium, iron-rich spinach and flaxseed (for a healthy dose of that Omega-3s). Blend up ½ cup vanilla Greek yogurt with 1 cup milk (of your choice), 1 tablespoon peanut butter, 2 cups spinach, 1 banana, 3 strawberries, and 1 teaspoon flaxseed.

What are your favorite ways to eat yogurt?

By Priyanshi Bhatnagar

8 Proven Steps to Lose Weight Instead of Counting Calories + 9 My Personal Strategy

My previous article was entirely emphasised on why we should stop counting calories for overall health benefits.

But while I focused on reasons to stop counting calories and it impacts our physical and mental well being.

So, here I bring out the healthy ways of getting the result of most of your health goals naturally and holistically.

This is exactly how we should do for better longterm health.

Instead of pulling out your logbook and pens, follow these tips and you’ll naturally begin to drop weight while healing your body and satisfying hunger pangs, ensuring your belly doesn’t constantly ring the alarm that’s it’s hungry. Speaking of which, to curb your appetite quickly and easily—without diet pills or counting calorie plans—don’t miss our essential healthy eating ways.

1. Listen to your body: Notice the sensations your my body before, during, and after eating.

Think about what you eat makes you feel. Is it satisfying? Enjoyable to eat? Does it keep you full until lunch or does it leave you wanting a snack after an hour?

“For example, does the meal gives you sustained energy or do you have an energy crash?”

2. Tune in to what your body actually wants.

Healthy eating encourages you to get back in touch with your body’s own signals that tell us what to eat and when rather than relying on external cues like strict diet rules.

“Diet culture has disconnected us from our bodies and the wisdom that lies within it.” If we were to get out of our head and listen and connect to our body, we’d eat a lot differently.

3. Eat more plants and whole foods.

Fill up on foods containing fiber, healthy fats and phytonutrients like fruits, nuts, beans, virgin plant oils, non-starchy veggies, minimally processed whole grains, and fish, as well as yoghurt with live probiotics.

Cheese, eggs, poultry and unprocessed red meat can be eaten in moderation.

4. Eat fewer processed foods.

It’s best to minimize your intake of ultra-processed foods such as chips, candy, soda and packaged snack cakes — basically anything containing ingredients like artificial flavours, hydrogenated oils and emulsifiers.

5. Cook at Home more.

Take a break from those nightly takeout orders. Take-out and restaurant meals are often high in sugar, sodium and unhealthy fat — not to mention the portion sizes can be excessive. When you’re preparing your own food, however, you’re in charge of the ingredients that go into each meal to assure they align with your health goals.

6. Make a Nutrition checklist.

Make sure all the 5 major food groups have an appearance. (How many servings of fruits did you have today? Did any of your meals contain healthy fats like avocado, olive oil, or nuts?) Keep notes on how many servings of each food group you had-it’s the best way to ensure you get everything you need while avoiding empty-calorie foods.

7. Understand Meal portions.

Three ounces of meat is about the size of a deck of cards, a half cup of grains is roughly the size of your palm, and one cup of veggies is equivalent to a medium-sized fist. Stick to those approximate measurements so you don’t eat too much.

8. Follow the 80-20 rule

Because creating healthy habits takes time, be sure to leave room for error during your weight-loss journey. The idea is simple: just eat healthfully 80 per cent of the time and leave 20 per cent of the time to splurge. That way, you won’t feel guilty and stressed if you happen to nab a slice of pizza at your cousin’s backyard party.

Just try to keep the bar high on your indulgences. For example, make your own homemade desserts using quality ingredients instead of buying those packaged, processed cakes.

Here are my 9 personal things I do instead of counting calories:

1. I always eat when I’m hungry.

2. I eat foods that I’m actually in the mood to eat.

3. I put my full attention on the meal in front of me.

4. I sit down when I eat.

5. I chew every bite before taking another.

6. I enjoy the flavours, texture, mouthfeel, sounds, richness, crunchiness or softness, saltiness or sweetness.

7. I make an effort to eat healthy foods and make an equal effort to eat the healthy foods that taste good to me.

8. I sometimes choose to eat foods purely for the please of eating them, even when they are not “healthy”.

9. I sometimes choose to eat more food than is comfortable, either because the food tastes really good or because I know I won’t have time to eat again for a while (such as during a busy workday).

It’s empowering to know that your body knows best. It validates all of those signals your body sends you a moment to moment, even the urge to eat a little something extra at the end of a meal.

Now before you go, I’d love to hear your opinion in the comments below.

11 Top Reasons Why You Should Stop Counting Calories

(…)

And every time, my friend jump to her calorie calculator whenever eating the food.

But for how long could she continue this habit of calculating every meal?

You’ll have to wait to find out. But first, let’s take a look at how I find people calculating calories….

It’s a funny thing for me to see, as the more u count calories, the less u are paying attention to the food in front of you. It is like looking at a spreadsheet on a plate. All you see is numbers.

Counting calories is a time-consuming, soul-sucking practise that’s actually a lesson in futility, as far as I’m concerned. Yet people continue to do it. They pull out their calorie-tracking apps and plug-in whatever foods they’ve eaten, feeling guilty when they go over their “recommended” calorie amounts, then running to the gym to try to undo it all. And I can’t blame them: The idea that monitoring all your calories is key for ”weight loss” is a popular one.

Let me tell you weight loss is about so much more than calories. It encompasses exercise, how you sleep, how stressed you are, and health issues that you may not be able to control, like hormonal changes. That’s why, if losing weight is your goal, it’s important to acknowledge how individual a process it is and figure out how to do it in a way that’s healthy for you.

Reasons to Stop Counting Calories

1) Labels can lie

Seriously. Labelling laws allow a 20% margin of error on the nutrition facts panel. That means your 100-calorie snack pack could be 119 calories. Or that 500 calorie Internet dinner could be nearly 600 calories.

2) Nutrients vary by season, variety, ripeness, etc

There is no way food companies or the USDA could have the nutrient analysis of every variety of food from every region from every season from different growing conditions (i.e organic vs. conventional) and every other variable for nutrients, including calories.

That super-sweet summer fruit likely has more calories (and valuable nutrients) than that tasteless, pick one from the dead of winter. Which one would you rather eat?

3) “More calories equals weight gain” is not an exact science

Trouble is, when you focus on calories, you’re likely to eat less fat (since fat is more calorie-dense than carbohydrate and protein). And when you eat less fat, you’re likely to eat more carbohydrates. See the problem?

4)Focusing on calories often means we restrict healthy foods

This especially happens when it comes to fat. We often omit higher fat foods simply because they are higher in calories without taking into consideration what benefits we might get from them, such as staying fuller for longer and getting necessary nutrients, like fat-soluble vitamins.

5)You don’t know how many calories your body is absorbing from food

Everything from how your food is processed to how much fiber it contains determines how many calories you’re absorbing from it. Even the bacteria in your gut may play a part in how you digest food and how many calories you derive from it.

For example, you’ll absorb more calories peanut butter versus whole peanuts. Due to size differences, one sweet potato varies in calories from another before you even take it off the shelf at the store. Calories absorbed is a complex business that’s light years beyond any calorie-counting app on the market.

6)Counting calories can encourage you to ignore your hunger cues

Focusing entirely on calories, instead of the quality of the food you’re eating and how you actually feel before chowing down (hungry, bored, stressed, etc.), can wreak havoc on those precious hunger cues you’re born with.

Whether you’re eating just because you “have calories left,” even though you’re not truly hungry, or you’re not eating because you’ve “gone over” your calorie allotment for the day, but you’re actually still hungry, you’re doing the same thing: ignoring what your body is trying to tell you.

Trust your body, because it knows what it needs a lot more than some random number or tracker

7)Calorie counting adds to the misconception you can “work off” the food you eat

Nope. Your body doesn’t burn off food calorie-for-calorie like that.

Let me emphasize that “it is where the calories come from that is crucial” in determining whether your body is tempted to store them as fat, use them for energy, or apply them to some other mechanism.

Plus, if you do routinely overindulge then try to work it off in the gym, you’ll be exercising for a very long time, depending on the size of the junky meals you’ve eaten. This, in turn, may cause you to become hungrier…and eat more. Vicious cycle? Definitely.

The good news is that when you only overeat from time to time, your body can handle those extra calories without making you gain weight. It’s when you overeat on a more frequent basis that you can get into the weight-gain territory.

8)It puts us in a restrictive diet mentality

Restriction leads to feelings of deprivation, which leads to feelings of desperation, which leads to binges or obsessive thoughts or cravings, which leads to feelings of guilt or shame, followed by more restriction and over and over”. This is completely normal and not caused by a lack of self-control or willpower — it’s because your body is sensing that restriction.

9)You might fixate on a number rather than on nutrition

If you’re counting calories, you might end up excluding certain nutrient-dense foods from your diet just because they’re higher in calories: think avocados, salmon, olive oil, walnuts or chia seeds. Instead, you might go for something with less nutritional value ― like, say, a 100-calorie pack of crackers ― just because it will help you stay under your allotment for the day.

From a health perspective, it is better to focus on the quality of the diet ― e.g. avoiding ultra-processed foods and eating adequate amounts of produce.

10)You may develop an unhealthy relationship with food.

For some, counting calories (or any other eating plan that requires strict adherence) can lead to an obsession with food, which can result in disordered eating habits and increase anxiety and depression.

If you have a medical condition that requires a specific diet, it should be monitored by a health professional, such as a nutritionist.

11)You may be able to lose weight this way, but keeping it off will be a challenge

Indeed, restricting calories may yield weight loss in the short term, but for many people, it’s not sustainable. And it’s not because of a lack of effort or willpower.

“Eventually the body begins to fight back, activating multiple overlapping mechanisms for preventing weight loss that was developed in our evolutionary past when food was scarce.”

In the end, calories matter, but the number of calories we eat — and burn — are both influenced long-term by the types of food we eat,”

Now before you go, I’d love to hear your opinion in the comments below.

By Priyanshi Bhatnagar

Constipation Cure: It’s Not as Difficult as You Think

Constipation is an incredibly common problem. It can be caused by foods you eat or avoid, lifestyle choices, medication or disease.

Constipation relief may be as close as your kitchen!

These natural home remedies for constipation will help get your bowels back on track.

1. Sesame seeds

Sesame seeds make great home remedies for constipation. The oily composition of sesame seeds works to moisturize the intestines, which can help if dry stools are a problem and provide constipation relief. Add the seeds to cereals or salads for crunch, or pulverize them in a coffee grinder and sprinkle on food like a seasoning.

2. Mint or Ginger tea

Peppermint contains menthol, which has an antispasmodic effect that relaxes the muscles of the digestive tract. Ginger is a “warming” herb that causes the inside of the body to generate more heat; this can help speed up sluggish digestion.

Here is the recipe https://www.verywellfit.com/ginger-tea-recipe-88180

3. Lemon water

The citric acid in lemon juice acts as a stimulant to your digestive system and can help flush toxins from your body, providing constipation relief. Squeeze fresh lemon juice into a glass of water every morning, or add lemon to tea.

4. Cup of coffee

Caffeinated coffee can stimulate your gut in the same way that a meal can. Coffee may also contain small amounts of soluble fibers that help prevent constipation by improving the balance of your gut bacteria. Coffee is also a diuretic, however, so make sure to keep drinking water or your constipation could become worse.

5. Prune Juice and Prunes

Prunes are high in fiber and sorbitol, a carbohydrate the body digests slowly. As the fiber and sorbitol move along the intestines, they collect water which softens fecal matter. Start with an 8 oz glass of prune juice or 2-3 prunes.

6. Water

Staying hydrated facilitates digestion and supports muscle function. When the body receives enough water, the digestive system can process nutrients and move wastes along smoothly. Generally, you should divide your body weight in half, take that number and drink that many ounces of water.

7. Baking Soda and Warm Water

Mix one teaspoon of baking soda in a quarter cup of warm water. Supposedly, this mixture should relieve pain and pressure associated with constipation, and the bicarbonate is believed to reduce the symptoms associated with heartburn. The faster you drink it up, the more effective it seems to be.

Anything else?

Constipation is an uncomfortable problem with a number of underlying causes.

If this is a problem for you, then you should definitely speak to your nutritionist to identify the potential cause and find an effective treatment protocol.

That being said, many of the natural home remedies in this article can also provide significant relief.

By Priyanshi Bhatnagar

8 Surprising Guilt-free Healthy Diabetes Snacks

No more Snacks! You are not allowed to eat sugar, salt or fat……

Ugh! You are depressed, bored by eating the tasteless foods. Other people around you are relishing delightful snacks, but you are eating the same blended food.

It’s your life, that’s not okay… at all! You will have to find the snacks which are healthy and diabetic friendly with good flavour too.

Maybe you have to prepare your snacks list…

Are you ready to for it ?

So let me tell you Healthy snacks for diabetics don’t have to be boring and flavourless. In fact, it’s a myth that diabetics have to eat restrictive diets filled only with highly specialized foods. Diabetics, like everyone else, just need to eat healthy foods low in fat, salt, and sugar.

To manage blood sugar levels, diabetics do need to be careful when it comes to carbohydrates, including starches and sugars. That’s why we’ve curated a list of nutrient-rich snacks that keep refined sugars and unhealthy carbohydrates to a minimum.

Choosing a smart snack requires more than watching out for fat, sodium, and calories. Carefully selected snacks can help you get more of the nutrients and food groups you may fall short on. A serving of each of our top 8 snacks meets the following nutrition criteria, which address the concerns of people with diabetes:

• 200 calories or less

• 30 grams of carbohydrate or less

• 240 milligrams of sodium or less

• 0 grams of trans fat

• Limited fat, saturated fat, and added sugars

• At least one nutritional plus, such as whole grains or vitamin C

Anyone, including non-diabetics, can use this list to achieve a vibrant and healthy snacking life.

1.Sweet potato toast

Sweet potatoes have a lower GI than white potatoes, as they release sugar more slowly and do not raise blood sugar as much. They are also a great source of fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C & potassium. sweet potato slices are crisped to perfection, top them with avocado, tahini, almond butter, mustard, or anything else you like.

2.Hard-boiled eggs

One large hard-boiled egg provides 6 grams of protein, which is helpful for diabetes because it keeps your blood sugar from rising too high after you eat . Hard-boiled egg or two for a snack on their own, or garnish them with a healthy topping like guacamole.

3.Yogurt with berries

An excellent diabetes-friendly snack, the antioxidants in berries may reduce inflammation and prevent damage to cells of the pancreas, also a great source of fiber. Yogurt is also known for its ability to lower blood sugar levels, due to the probiotics it contains.

4.Veggies and Hummus:

Hummus is a creamy spread made from chickpeas, provides lots of protein, with 3 grams per tablespoon. It tastes great when paired with raw veggies. Both vegetables and hummus are good sources of fiber, vitamins and minerals.

This is my favourite homemade hummus recipe! 

https://www.inspiredtaste.net/15938/easy-and-smooth-hummus-recipe/

5.Sliced apples with nut butter:

Apples are rich in several nutrients, including B vitamins, vitamin C and potassium, while peanut butter provides significant amounts of vitamin E, magnesium and manganese, all of which are known to help manage diabetes. Both apples and peanut butter are also very high in fiber.

6. Chia Seed Pudding

Chia seed pudding is made by soaking chia seeds in milk until the mixture achieves a pudding-like consistency. It’s a healthy snack because chia seeds are rich in many nutrients that help stabilize blood sugar, including protein, fiber and omega-3 fatty acids.

How to make chia pudding:

https://feelgoodfoodie.net/recipe/3-ingredient-chia-pudding/

7. Trail Mix

It is a snack made by combining nuts, seeds and dried fruit. A 1-ounce (28-gram) serving of trail mix provides almost 4 grams of protein, which makes it a filling snack that may promote blood sugar control in people with diabetes. It also provides some healthy fats and fiber from the nuts and seeds, which have been shown to help reduce blood sugar and insulin levels.

8.Cantaloupe with Creamy Cottage Cheese

The melon is an excellent source of vitamin A and C. Plus, the Low-fat and low-sodium cottage cheese add 7 g of protein to the snack and supplies a good source of calcium. Top 1 cup of cut-up melon with ¼ cup of low-fat cottage cheese.

Snacking often gets a bad rap. But if you are managing type 2 diabetes, including healthy snacks in your diet can be a great way to keep blood sugar levels in a healthy range and energy levels high. They can also be a great weight-loss tool.

By Priyanshi Bhatnagar

7 Best Natural Drinks To Improve Gut Health You Need to Try

It’s always difficult for people to consume gut-healthy foods in their daily diet to fight with body inflammation.

Though Taking probiotics or supplements is obviously one way to boost your gut health, but I prefer natural foods as the best source to help improve immunity and your overall gut health.

Did you feel this, too?

How do you improve your gut health naturally?

”By consuming gut-healthy foods and drinks, you can reduce inflammation in your gut, say goodbye to digestive symptoms like gas and bloating, and boost your immunity.” 

Caring for your gut is a very important component of a good health routine. Every day, it seems that yet another study links its bacteria to some component of well-being, whether it’s mental health or acne-free skin. Taking probiotics is obviously one way to boost your microbiome, but we prefer these easy recipes to help improve digestion and your overall gut health.

Never to underestimate the importance of gut health when it comes to your body and wellbeing.

1. Celery Juice

Celery juice is filled with vitamins A, C, and K, and is an antioxidant. But it also is amazing for reducing gut inflammation.

“It contains a flavonoid named luteolin, which has been proven to inhibit gut inflammation.” 

2. Aloe juice

Aloe juice is a natural laxative that can help reduce inflammation and decrease discomfort for people suffering from IBS.

“Due to its laxative properties, it can cause some digestive discomfort in those who are not accustomed to it.”

3. Water

Water keeps things moving along, balances the good bacteria in the gut, and protects the intestines. Consider sipping ”alkaline water”, which supports a healthy colon and encourages the growth of probiotics.

Touted as nature’s digestive aid, water is a major component of every single cell that lines your digestive tract, meaning you need plenty of it for those cells to function.

4. Bone broth

It is one of the “gut healing” drinks. It contains glutamine, an amino acid that has been shown to soothe and repair the gut.

“Bone broth can help to reduce inflammation in your gut and heal the membrane,” 

5. Prune juice

Soluble fiber—the main type of fiber found in prune juice, can help to slow the absorption of sugars and improve blood sugar levels.

Prune juice is chock-full of dietary fiber. ”It can alleviate and prevent constipation, and that they may even prevent colon cancer. ”

6. Ginger tea

Drinking warm ginger tea just before or during a big meal may improve digestive health and prevent heartburn, stomachache and indigestion. Ginger has been used for centuries to soothe the GI tract, this is because the root stimulates saliva flow, bile and gastric juice production, which jump-starts the breakdown of the food you eat.

”It also stimulates the production of certain gut-healthy bacterial species, acting as a prebiotic. Plus, you’ll reap all of the other benefits of this powerful root!”

7. Water kefir

For those of us who are lactose intolerant, water kefir makes a great alternative to milk kefir. It can be made by combining water, sugar, and fruit. 

“ It is full of probiotic bacteria to boost your immunity and improve your digestion.”

8. Yoghurt

Especially the types that contain live active cultures, is incredibly healthy for your gut. Just remember to avoid the varieties that are sugar-laden, as these will only feed the bad bugs living in your gut.

Everyone’s microbiome is unique,” like a fingerprint, so we can’t yet promise that certain ingredient will boost yours. The best advice is to mix up the drinks you have, for maximum diversity. Having a healthier gut doesn’t need to be difficult; there are plenty of drinks that contribute to gut health, and it can be as simple as switching up what you drink.

By Priyanshi Bhatnagar