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Sip On These 5 Calming Lattes that Help Your Body to Relieve Stress and Anxiety

Mostly, our first reaction when we are overcome with stress is to look for an easy solution such as alcohol or medications.

Instead of reaching for that third cup of coffee for an energy boost or a nightcap to de-stress, we rounded up best natural herbal filled lattes with everyday ingredients that are known as powerful remedies for fighting fatigue, anxiety, and stress.

An easy way to calm the body, though, is through nutrition. Specific drinks are known for their superfood powers to alleviate anxiety and stress quickly. Some simple options include: water, tart cherry juice, warm milk, and a variety of herbal teas.

But if you’re looking for something that feels just a little more gourmet, here are five drink recipes that are sure to help you destress and relieve anxiety – all while tasting totally delicious.

Now, these soothing drinks will have a calming effect on your body, that will lead you to absolute peace of mind!

My dear friends, we have a lot of yummy soothing drinks to relieve stress in our pantry! Bring your senses and stay focused as we have also shared recipes of drinks that relieve stress.

1. Turmeric Latte

Curcumin, the bioactive compound found in turmeric, has been linked to boosts serotonin levels, can help relieve anxiety and depression and maybe just as effective as antidepressants.

Ingredients

1 cup milk of choice

1 teaspoon ground turmeric

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Pinch black pepper

Pinch sea salt

1 heaping teaspoon coconut oil

1 teaspoon natural sweetener of choice (I especially love stevia )

Instructions

In a small saucepan, heat milk, turmeric, vanilla, pepper, salt and sweetener, until very warm but not yet boiling. Transfer to a blender and blend with coconut oil until frothy. Pour into a mug and drink immediately.

2. Ashwagandha Latte

Adaptogens are naturally occurring substances that help our bodies deal with and adapt to stress, found in Ashwagandha which in particular is a stress-fighting superstar. It benefits to reduce the body’s stress hormone, relieves anxiety and prevents stress-related fatigue.

Ingredients

1 cup of milk ( try with non-dairy milk)

1 teaspoon ashwagandha powder

½ teaspoon cinnamon powder

½ teaspoon stevia or organic honey

Instructions

Warm the milk, then add the powdered spices and sweetener

Stir well, using the whisk to blend, adjusting for sweetness if necessary

Pour into a nice cup and enjoy.

3.Matcha Latte

Matcha contains flavonoids and L-theanine, which is historically known for its relaxing effects. L-theanine increases the brain’s alpha frequency band, relaxing the band without causing drowsiness. Considering matcha is also packed with antioxidants, vitamins, and nutrients, it can be a powerful tonic for beating fatigue and boosting your overall health and providing sustained energy.

Ingredients

1 tsp matcha green tea powder

1 tsp stevia powder

3 tbsp warm water

300ml hot milk

Instructions

Spoon the matcha green tea powder and the stevia powder into a mug or cup.

Add the warm water and mix with a spoon or with a whisk until it is a smooth dark green paste to ensure no lumps form.

Warm the milk in a small saucepan and pour into the mug until nearly full. Use a whisk to mix the paste and milk together until smooth and light green in colour.

4. Ginger Tea Latte

Super spice ginger is the key player in this healthy latte. This spice is a favourite in India and praised for its ability to relieve digestive issues, nausea, and aches in your muscles and joints. After sipping this drink, you can be sure that you’ll feel refreshed and ready to take on the day.

Ingredients

1 cup milk(250 ml)

½ tsp ginger powder

½ tsp ground cinnamon

1 tbsp organic honey or stevia

1 teabag, I prefer Chai tea

Instructions

Place all the ingredients in a saucepan (except the teabag) and stir. I used a milk frother to get a better texture, but it’s optional. You can also blend the mixture in a blender if you want.

Cook over high heat until it’s hot, but don’t bring it to a boil.

Remove from the heat, pour the mixture into a mug, add the tea bag and let it infuse according to package directions.

Remove the teabag and your ginger tea latte is ready to drink.

5. Lavender Vanilla Latte

The lavender helps the brain to halt production of the chemicals that cause negative or stressed emotions, helping you restore a sense of calm, while the adaptogenic mushroom Reishi has a normalizing effect on the body. This means if the immune system is depressed, adaptogens enhance the immune response.

If the immune system is overactive—for instance with inflammation—adaptogens help re-regulate the immune response, decreasing overactivity, thus majorly restoring balance in your body. Finished off with a touch of sweetness from stevia and vanilla bean it’s the ultimate dreamy, creamy concoction when you’re in need of some serious zen vibes.

Ingredients

½ cup hot water

1 cup of heated milk

1 tsp culinary-grade lavender (or one lavender tea bag)

1 tsp coconut oil

½ tsp vanilla

Stevia for sweetness

Instructions

Steep the lavender or lavender tea bag in hot water for 3-5 minutes. (If using loose lavender, strain before adding to blend.) Add the rest of the ingredients to the blender. Blend, mix together, and enjoy!

Health Tip:

Feel free to use any milk or natural sweetener, but I used Stevia because of its immense amount of health benefits.

And if you want to why I choose that in all my recipes then find out here :

https://detoxpri.in/2020/07/09/the-truth-about-stevia-and-is-it-helpful-for-people-with-diabetes/

By Priyanshi Bhatnagar

Busting The 5 Biggest Nutrition Myths

I’m feeling bloated, so I must have a problem with gluten.
The Truth: Not all bloating is caused by problems with gluten. With coeliac disease – a permanent intolerance to gluten – not all sufferers experience bloating. It has been suggested that only 40 per cent of adults with coeliac disease have any abdominal symptoms (and about five per cent have no symptoms).

1. A gluten-free diet is healthier

In a word, no. It’s not. Unless you have a legitimate reason to be avoiding gluten – if you have coeliac disease, for example – there is no reason to remove gluten from your diet. Due to its presence in wheat, barley and rye, gluten is present in many carbohydrate-based foods, some of which can be unhealthy (think biscuits, cakes, pies, and pastries). This may be the reason it’s gained such a reputation, but gluten itself isn’t unhealthy.

It is not the absence of gluten which makes for a healthier diet but rather the foods that are included. Because a gluten-free diet excludes many refined, processed foods, it can be very healthy – it often includes more fresh fruit and vegetables, nuts and seeds, fresh meat, fish, chicken and legumes, all of which are nutrient-rich foods. But a gluten-free diet can also be low in fibre, and some gluten-free products have a high glycaemic index, meaning they are rapidly metabolised and don’t leave us feeling satisfied for very long.

Another risk for the gluten-free eater is a lack of whole grains. These are a good source of B vitamins, and a gluten-free diet can be low in B vitamins if the gluten-free grains used are not carefully chosen.

2. No sugar has a place in my diet

Of course, having too much sugar will lead to problems like weight gain and long term health problems. But, glucose is essential to our body.

This idea that sugar is inherently bad for you is a myth “. We all need sugar; that’s the basic block of what runs our bodies. It’s necessary to survive.

Sugar is sugar and, ultimately, all sugar is broken down in our bodies into glucose, which our cells use for energy. However, the difference between that teaspoon of sugar you add to your tea and the natural sugar in a piece of fruit is the presence of vitamins and minerals.

That said, eliminating all sugar from your diet would be almost impossible. Fruit, potatoes, and other starchy foods all have high glycemic indexes, so you’d have to eliminate all of them before your sugar intake was whittled down to nothing. 

The same can be said of lactose, the sugar found in milk and dairy products. Although it’s still a form of sugar, lactose comes with a healthy dose of the vitamins and minerals that dairy has to offer, such as calcium.

Honey, maple syrup, and agave syrup are all still natural forms of sugar – however, they are similar to refined sugar, in that their actual nutrient content is quite poor.

Cutting back on added sugar doesn’t mean you have to ignore your sweet tooth altogether. But when it comes calling, it’s best to have smarter choices.

3.Low fat = healthy

Contrary to deeply entrenched opinion, a low-fat diet is not necessarily a healthy one. The important thing is not to cut out fat entirely, but to make sure that you’re eating the right kind. Unsaturated fats are the ones our bodies need and use. They have been associated with lower blood cholesterol, and are found in foods such as oils, nuts, seeds, avocado, and oily fish.

Low-fat products are only useful when they are helping you to reduce your intake of saturated fat, the type of fat associated with high cholesterol and heart disease risk. If you do choose these kinds of products, make sure you read the nutrition information label to make sure they’re free from added sugar.

As it applies to food marketing, the termlow fat” is synonymous with “loaded with salt and cheap carbohydrates.” For instance, look at Smucker’s Reduced Fat Peanut Butter. To replace the fat it skimmed out, Smucker’s added a fast-digesting carbohydrate called maltodextrin. That’s not going to help you lose weight. A 2008 study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that over a 2-year span, people on low-carb diets lost 62 per cent more bodyweight than those trying to cut fat. (Plus, the fat in peanut butter is heart-healthy monounsaturated fat—you’d be better off eating more of it, not less!)

4. Eating carbs will make me fat

First, the Atkins diet claimed to be the solution to weight loss and health.

Now its younger cousin, the keto diet, is implying that you just weren’t restricting carbohydrates quite enough for it to work properly.

Can we stop demonizing carbohydrates already?

Apply the same theory here as you do with fat and focus on the type of carbohydrate you are eating, rather than cutting it out completely.

Starchy carbohydrates come in two forms: refined and whole. The latter are the ones to go for – higher in fibre and full of other essential vitamins and minerals. In fact, far from making you gain weight, eating high-fibre foods will help to keep you feeling full, which means you are less likely to overeat.

We need starchy carbohydrates to give us energy, and they should make up one-third of our diet. Instead of cutting them out, make some smart switches and cut down on the more unhealthy carbs, like highly refined flour products.

I’m not going to talk about this for very long, because there are hundreds of articles on the internet giving you lists of carbohydrates that you “should” and “shouldn’t” eat, pitting them off against each other like some sort of gladiatorial fight to the death.

It is calories, not carbs, that really matter in terms of fat loss, whichever dietary strategy helps you achieve this is the right one for you whether that’s low carb, high carb or somewhere in between.

We have a problem in the scientific community, and that problem is identity.

“Low carb” has become part of one’s identity, with the rise of “low carb doctors” and “low carb dietitians.”

Despite all the available evidence falsifying the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis of obesity, many are unwilling to let go of their dogma and genuinely explore the evidence and their identity.

5. If I exercise, I need to take a protein shake or supplement

It’s true that if you are exercising you need protein. Our muscles need protein to grow and repair, and if you are undertaking exercise – particularly anything of high intensity – then you do need to make sure your protein intake is sufficient.

You don’t need a protein supplement “unless you are a frail, elderly person with limited food intake.” Supplements are purely for convenience. There’s nothing in a drink made from a supplement that is superior to regular food.

What is more important, though, is the timing of that protein intake, which should ideally be within an hour of exercising. Your body can only metabolise a certain amount of protein at a time, so overloading on the protein shakes is completely pointless. In general, most of us can actually get more than enough protein through our regular diets. The goal should be to limit our protein intake to shortly after exercise so that our bodies can use it to help our muscles build and repair, rather than overdoing it on the protein shakes!

If, however, you do need to up your protein intake around intense exercise, don’t go for questionable powders – go homemade with the combination of natural protein sources.

If your workouts consist of hopping on the elliptical trainer for 30 to 60 minutes every other day, you’ll probably do just fine eating a balanced diet that consists of healthy meals and snacks. For the average gym-goer, eating a few hours after a workout should be fine.

Practically speaking, if you eat sufficient protein at every regular meal, you are going to get in all of the protein you need around your workouts, Schoenfeld says. No extra post-workout shakes required.

“If your workout does warrant a recovery meal, eat a healthy meal, not a supplement”.

By Priyanshi Bhatnagar

Include this Dairy-free Pumpkin Soup in your Diet to Lose Weight

Do You Know?
Pumpkins are 90% water.
There are more than 45 different varieties of pumpkin.
Every single part of a pumpkin is edible.
Pumpkins are fruits and not vegetables.
As a food, pumpkin can be baked, roasted, steamed or boiled.

Pumpkins and pumpkin soups are a powerhouse of vitamins A, B6, B12 and C which are needed for boosting overall health. It also has calcium important for bone health. It also has iron content.

Many people think of pumpkins as little more than a Halloween decoration or a pie filling, or something to make a face at when asked to eat.  However, it may be time to rethink this plump, nutritious orange vegetable from the squash family.

They are a powerhouse of all kinds of vitamins, minerals, proteins and various nutrients that promote weight loss, better gut health and a good boost of micro-nutrients.

Health benefits of eating pumpkin soup

Pumpkin soup is not only a wonderful option for anyone fighting indigestion and stomach infections, but also for those on a weight loss program.

This soup is soothing, gentle and easy to digest with soluble fibers that help keep you full. It is low in calories, high in energy and can also help balance your electrolytes after a hard day.

1. Improves eyesight

Pumpkin soup is a powerhouse of Vitamin A which helps improve your vision and provides you with protection for your eyes. The antioxidants in pumpkin could help prevent degenerative damage to the eyes.

2. Aids Weight loss

A small amount of pumpkin soup with light cheese is only 70-80 calories for a one-cup serving. It is extremely rich in fiber as well.

This is a soup that fills you up even with a small serving, helps you to digest and can help you to shed weight because you will be eating fewer calories each day.

3. Lowers risk of diseases

Pumpkins can play a big role in preventing cancer and other serious diseases. Pumpkins have also been shown to fight off certain types of cancers. This means you can not only prevent disease with pumpkin soup but fight off diseases as well.

4. Boosts energy

Even though this soup is low in calories, it is high in energy. A single cup of pumpkin added to your soup contains more potassium than a full banana.

This means your body can balance its electrolytes, recover from a hard work out and have a large amount of energy to get you through the day.

5. Improves bone health

The light cheese / non-dairy milk you add to the soup will help to improve your bone health with its high calcium nutrients. Depending on the variety of dairy alternative that you use it is also possible to enjoy this topping with very low calories.

Soups are a delicious, healthy way to satisfy your hunger with minimal fat and calories. And healthy pumpkin soup recipes made from either fresh or canned pumpkin are a great example.

My Dairy-free Pumpkin Soup is rich and creamy from substituting coconut milk for the more traditional dairy cream.  This recipe would look lovely on your dinner table, and leftovers would go great with sandwiches or salads the next day.

Recipe yields 4 bowls or 6 cups of soup.

INGREDIENTS

• 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided

• One 4-pound sugar pie pumpkin

• 1 large yellow onion, chopped

• 4 large or 6 medium garlic cloves, pressed or minced

• ½ teaspoon of sea salt

• ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

• ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg

• ⅛ teaspoon cloves

• A tiny dash of cayenne pepper (optional, if you like spice)

• Freshly ground black pepper

• 4 cups (32 ounces) vegetable broth

• ½ cup full-fat coconut milk

• 2 tablespoons maple syrup or honey or stevia

• ¼ cup pepitas (green pumpkin seeds)

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit and line a baking sheet with parchment paper for easy cleanup. Carefully halve the pumpkin and scoop out the seeds.

2. Slice each pumpkin halve in half to make quarters. Brush or rub 1 tablespoon olive oil over the flesh of the pumpkin and place the quarters, cut sides down, onto the baking sheet. Roast for 35 minutes or longer, until the orange flesh is easily pierced through with a fork. Set it aside to cool for a few minutes.

3. Heat the remaining 3 tablespoons olive oil in a large Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Once the oil is shimmering, add onion, garlic and salt to the skillet. Stir to combine. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is translucent, about 8 to 10 minutes. In the meantime, peel the pumpkin skin off the pumpkins and discard the skin.

4. Add the pumpkin flesh, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, cayenne pepper (if using), and a few twists of freshly ground black pepper. Use your stirring spoon to break up the pumpkin a bit. Pour in the broth. Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for about 15 minutes, to give the flavours time to meld

5. While the soup is cooking, toast the pepitas in a medium skillet over medium-low heat, stirring frequently, until fragrant, golden and making little popping noises. You want them to be nice and toasty, but not burnt. Transfer pepitas to a bowl to cool.

6. Once the pumpkin mixture is done cooking, stir in the coconut milk and maple syrup. Remove the soup from heat and let it cool slightly. You can use a blender to blend this soup in the pot. Also, protect your hand from steam escaping from the top of the blender as you purée the mixture until smooth. Transfer the puréed soup to a serving bowl.

7. Taste and adjust if necessary (you might want to add more coconut milk for extra creaminess/milder flavour, or maple syrup to make it a little sweeter).

8. Ladle the soup into individual bowls. Sprinkle pepitas over the soup and serve.

Storage Tip :

Let leftover soup cool completely before transferring it to a proper storage container and refrigerating it for up to 4 days (leftovers taste even better the next day!). Or, freeze this soup for up to 3 months.

ARE YOU READY TO SLIM DOWN WITH PUMPKIN SOUP?

What Is the Keto Diet, How It Works and Why It May Not Be Safe?

Recently, many of my clients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is a ketogenic diet safe? Would you recommend it?
Is eating a lot of fat really the best way to lose weight?
Keto devotees believe that if you banish most carbs (including fruit!) and embrace fat, you can lose weight without feeling hungry.

What is a ketogenic (keto) diet?

The keto diet, short for “ketogenic,” involves eating a high amount of fat, a moderate amount of protein and very few carbs — even fruit is off the table. As with any fad diet, adherents tout weight loss increased energy and greater mental clarity among the benefits. But is the keto diet all it’s cracked up to be?

The keto diet was originally designed not for weight loss, but for epilepsy.

In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis).

Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones.

How the ketogenic diet works

The goal of the ketogenic diet is to enter a state of ketosis (meaning that the body’s cells depend largely on ketones for energy) through fat metabolism. In a ketogenic state, the body uses primarily fat for energy instead of carbohydrates; with low levels of carbohydrate, fats can be converted into ketones to fuel the body.

It’s not entirely clear why that leads to weight loss, but ketosis seems to blunt the appetite and may affect hormones like insulin that regulate hunger. Fats and proteins may also keep people fuller than carbohydrates, leading to lower calorie intake overall.

Different Types of Ketogenic Diets

A “typical” ketogenic diet consists of at least 70 per cent of calories derived from fat, less than 10 per cent from carbs and less than 20 per cent from protein. The ketogenic diet, long used to treat epilepsy in children, calls for 90 per cent of daily calories to come from fat, with the amount of protein or carbs varying as long as it’s 4 grams of fat for every combined 1 gram of carb and protein.

There are several versions of the ketogenic diet, including:

Standard ketogenic diet (SKD): This is a very low-carb, moderate-protein and high-fat diet. It typically contains 75% fat, 20% protein and only 5% carbs.

Cyclical ketogenic diet (CKD): This diet involves periods of higher-carb refeeds, such as 5 ketogenic days followed by 2 high-carb days.

Targeted ketogenic diet (TKD): This diet allows you to add carbs around workouts.

High-protein ketogenic diet: This is similar to a standard ketogenic diet, but includes more protein. The ratio is often 60% fat, 35% protein and 5% carbs.

However, only the standard and high-protein ketogenic diets have been studied extensively. Cyclical or targeted ketogenic diets are more advanced methods and primarily used by bodybuilders or athletes.

The information in this article mostly applies to the standard ketogenic diet (SKD), although many of the same principles also apply to the other versions.

Can I lose weight on the keto diet?

Yes. Certainly in the short-term, it appears that way. For the first two to six months, there’s evidence that a very low-carbohydrate diet can help you lose more weight than the standard high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet.

The keto diet appears to deliver fast results: The first pounds may seem to slip off. That can be seductive but it’s likely water weight. It’s not like it is going to magically alter your metabolism to where calories don’t matter anymore. And when resuming the carbs, that water weight returns.

Are there side effects of the keto diet?

At first, some can experience some stomach issues and GI distress. Ninety per cent of calories from fat is probably going to be a shock to the system. Have cholesterol levels regularly checked, and replenish the fluids and sodium lost by increased urination and the severe restriction of carbohydrates. If not, within two to four days of beginning the diet, that depletion can bring on the “keto flu” — symptoms like dizziness, poor sleep and fatigue in some people.

On the diet, some people experience “keto breath,” halitosis likely caused by the production of acetone, which is one of the ketone bodies.

Possible side-effects for patients with epilepsy starting the diet include constipation from reduced fiber intake, vomiting, fatigue, hypoglycemia, worsening reflux and increased frequency of seizures. Patients with lipid disorders (like high cholesterol or triglycerides), heart failure and kidney and liver disease take caution if considering the diet. People on blood thinners should take extra care.

Patients with kidney disease need to be cautious because this diet could worsen their condition. Additionally, some patients may feel a little tired in the beginning, while some may have bad breath, nausea, vomiting, constipation, and sleep problems.

KETO DIET TIPS & TRICKS FOR BEGINNERS

1. Start Simple

Keep it simple, especially when you are starting out. The best way to start keto for beginners is to use a simple framework for your meals:

Pick a protein – Chicken, beef, pork, turkey, fish, seafood, protein powder, eggs, etc.

Pick a (low carb) veggie – Cauliflower, broccoli, zucchini, brussels sprouts, cucumbers, bell peppers, etc.

Add fat. Butter, oil, lard, ghee, cheese, bacon, avocado, mayonnaise, nuts, etc.

2.Examine Your Relationship With Fat

To prepare for a high-fat diet, which can be uncomfortable at first, start making small adjustments to what you eat every day, like ordering a burger on lettuce leaves and subbing green veggies for fries.

Instead of potatoes or rice with your meal, opt for a nonstarchy veggie. Start cooking with more oil, such as olive or avocado oil. Realize that old dieting habits — like making a plain skinless grilled chicken breast — just don’t make sense on a keto diet because you won’t get enough fat. Slowly start pushing out carbs and getting in fat. If you’re afraid of fat, a ketogenic diet won’t work for you.

3. Switch Up Your View of Protein

One of the most common misconceptions about the keto diet is that you can eat as much protein as you’d like. But this is not a diet where you watch carbs only — you also have to keep your protein intake moderate. Protein can be converted into glucose, and therefore overeating protein can take your body out of ketosis. Think of your ratios as a small portion of meat topped with a generous amount of fat, rather than the other way around.

4.Know What Side Effects to Expect (for Example, the ‘Keto Flu’)

For all the attributes of a ketogenic diet (like weight loss), there’s one big side effect you have to be prepared for: the keto flu, discussed before.

Along the same lines, you’ll want to be sure to take it easy with exercise for the first week or two as your body adjusts to burning more fat rather than carbs for fuel.

5.Acknowledge When Keto Might Not Be Right for You

Because you can’t eat beans or lentils on a ketogenic diet, and nuts and seeds are even limited due to their carbohydrate content, you’re really just left with some tofu and will need to rely on low-carb protein powder. There is a good possibility this won’t pan out. “I don’t see this as a sustainable diet due to the extreme restrictions”.

In addition, there are medical conditions that should make you think twice about starting keto — or at least talk to your doctor before trying it out. Those include people on insulin, as well as those on oral and noninsulin injectable medications for high blood sugar. Even struggling with GI issues may be a barrier to starting. Last consideration: If existing personal dietary restrictions require you to avoid foods like soy, eggs, nuts, dairy, or seafood, a ketogenic diet may be too limiting for you.

6.Have an After Plan, Because Keto Isn’t Meant to Be a Long-Term Weight Loss Solution

A keto diet is not a forever diet. It’s designed to be short-term. Some people go on a keto diet a few times per year, others will use it to lose weight and change their eating habits.

For some people, going on a keto diet is an effort to change those poor habits, but there’s the risk of falling back into your old ways once the diet is over.

Your ultimate goal should be “to shift your diet to a healthier pattern that involves eating less bread, less pasta, less flour, and less sugar,” as well as more nonstarchy veggies. Think about what that will look like for you once the keto diet is over.

How will you use this temporary diet as a springboard to bettering your long-term health?

Is a ketogenic diet healthy?

Not precisely! Low-carb diets like the keto do appear to lead to some short-term weight loss, but they’re not significantly more effective than any other commercial or self-help diet. And they don’t appear to improve athletic performance.

A ketogenic diet could be an interesting alternative to treat certain conditions and may accelerate weight loss. But it is hard to follow, and it can be heavy on red meat and other fatty, processed, and salty foods that are notoriously unhealthy.

Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and poor-quality fats from processed foods, with very few fruits and vegetables.

Instead of engaging in the next popular diet that would last only a few weeks to months (for most people that includes a ketogenic diet), try to embrace change that is sustainable over the long term. A balanced, unprocessed diet, rich in very colorful fruits and vegetables, lean meats, fish, whole grains, nuts, seeds, olive oil, and lots of water seems to have the best evidence for a long, healthier, vibrant life.

Advice we can all agree on: Eat healthily. There is no quick fix !

By Priyanshi Bhatnagar

Why Curd Rice is considered as a Best Brain Food and Makes You Happier

Eating Curd Rice Makes You A Happy Person, Seriously!
Having curd rice gives you such a sense of satisfaction and contentment. It also makes one feel restful and sometimes sleepy too, especially if eaten in excess.

Let’s examine today why this dish is so sought after and gives us this immense feeling of satiation, contentment and happiness.

Curd Rice is the only Indian food which releases a Chemical called Tryptophan in Brain. Indians alone take Curd as Curd. But the western world takes it as Yogurt, which has got Sugar too, and sugar will not calm your Brain, but increase Glucose level and will put one to more restlessness.  Sugar is dangerous for the Balance of Neural activity. It triggers hyperactivity.

But Curd rice is the only food which can release Tryptophan in Brain, which calms down and brings cool thinking, and your neurons are recharged with a mild rest because of Tryptophan.

Tryptophan is essential to us, as it is used to synthesise various other crucial chemical compounds for the human body like serotonin and melatonin.

However, tryptophan needs to reach the brain in order to be completely utilised by it, and this can only happen when it crosses the blood-brain barrier. This is not easy for tryptophan as it has to compete with other amino acids to enter the organ.

This is where the rice of “curd rice” comes in. This awesome combination of tryptophan-rich curd with the carbohydrate-filled rice can increase brain activity because as we learned earlier, it can be used to produce serotonin.

What is Tryptophan?

Tryptophan is the building block of a chemical called Serotonin. Serotonin has a wide variety of functions in the body, from playing a role in learning and memory to digestion. Serotonin is also a neuro-chemical and a natural mood regulator, which makes us feel happy, emotionally stable, less anxious, more tranquil and even more focused and energetic. Low levels of Serotonin are also linked to mood disorders like Depression.

Some of the other benefits associated with the consumption of curd rice are:

1. Promotes Weight Loss

2. A Cool Treat For Summers

3. Helpful For Digestion

4. Provides Energy

5.Great Mood Enhancing Capabilities

6. Can Be Beneficial For Blood Pressure

7. Helps In Brain Development

8. Helpful Against Irritable Bowel Syndrome

9. Stronger immunity

10. Good for eyes

11. Nourished and healthy skin

Curd Rice Recipe

Curd rice, a dish that originated from the southernmost part of India is now widely considered to be a tasty treat during hot, sultry days. In addition to its taste and many health benefits, if there is one more thing that makes curd rice a popular dish, it is the fact that it is really quite easy to prepare.

The simplicity of the dish makes it a popular dish made routinely across thousands of South Indian homes every day. It is one of those dishes that pack in simplicity along with an adequate amount of nutritional content.

The basic ingredients that you’ll require in order to prepare curd rice are:

• 1 cup of rice

• 2 cups curd

• 1 tbsp cumin powder

• 3-4 green chillies

• 3-4 curry leaves

• ½ cup urad dal

Now that we have the complete list of ingredients required for the preparation of curd rice all that is left to do is to learn how to prepare it.

The steps for making it are:

1. Boil the rice and then let it cool down.

2. This boiled rice must be then stirred alongside curd and salt( can use any mineral salt ), and mixed well until you get the consistency as per your requirement.

3. Now the next step involves the cooking of the urad dal. In a pan, add a few tablespoons of oil, and carefully cook urad dal by adding cumin powder and curry leaves to the mix.

4. Wait until the dal turns brown, and then add it to the mixture of curd and rice. After mixing them well, top them off with some green chillies and ground black pepper powder and it is ready to be served.

Well, now you can say that eating curd rice actually boosts your brain activity and makes you happier!

By Priyanshi Bhatnagar

Here is the SECRET for FLAWLESS GLOWING SKIN

There are plenty of cosmetics that dub themselves as “skin food,” the truth is that the key to maintaining a healthy complexion doesn’t come from a bottle. While it’s true these cleansers and lotions offer a topical fix—a beauty band-aid, if you will—gorgeous, hydrated skin starts from within. And that all depends on whether our best foods for glowing skin are on your plate.

A clean diet means a radiant you!

Whether you need to treat acne, ward off premature ageing, reduce the appearance wrinkles, or fight back against another pesky skin condition, the right diet can be a valuable aid.

Researchers have found that fitting certain healthy foods into your daily routine can help fight back against your complexion woes by turning off inflammatory genes and providing your body with the proper tools to strengthen and build healthy tissues.

What to eat for glowing skin is a question you simply can’t ignore.

Just about every woman desires to have glowing, flawless skin and would go to any length to achieve a clear complexion.

However, there are a number of factors such as the scorching sun, stress (both emotional and physiological), your hormones and even everyday pollution that prevent your skin from achieving the desired levels of skin perfection. You could try a million different means and ways to get soft and supple skin, especially one with that naturally brilliant shine, but none of them is going to help unless and until you start eating healthy.

The way to glowing skin, quite like the way to a person’s heart, is truly through the stomach! Your dietary habits impact your overall health and your skin is equally affected, perhaps the most affected by what you eat. Having a healthy stomach, bowel movement, gut and liver are imperative to having clear, unblemished skin, amongst a host of other health benefits.

For which you need to include certain foods in your diet. Basically, you need to follow a diet for glowing skin. Here’s a list of some of the healthy foods that will nourish your skin and get that healthy glow you’re after, within a few days…

1.Cooked Tomatoes

Lycopene, the phytochemical that makes tomatoes red, helps boosts collagen strength—a protein that gives skin its taut, youthful structure—and fights off the oxidizing effect of UV rays by eliminating skin-ageing free radicals.

Why is tomato paste one of our best foods for skin? It’s because cooking tomatoes ups their lycopene levels, so tomato sauce, gazpacho, and even ketchup pack on the protection.

2.Carrots

Think of carrots as your very own wonder wands—good for the eyes and good for clearing up breakouts. No magic here, though, just plenty of beta-carotene and vitamin A, an antioxidant which prevents overproduction of cells in the skin’s outer layer. That means fewer flaky dead cells that otherwise could combine with sebum to clog your pores. Plus, vitamin A plays an essential role in reducing the development of skin-cancer cells. It’s a win-win with this best food for the skin.

3.Turmeric

When the question—what to eat for glowing skin, arises turmeric is easily the most age-old answer. Antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, ‘anti-all bad things’ superhero of an ingredient is one you can add to everything right from your soups to your smoothies. The curcumin present in turmeric helps fight any bacterial infection both inside and outside your body, whether the turmeric is ingested or applied externally.

Plus, this spice can also be used to lighten dark pigmentation blotches or scars caused by ageing, hormone imbalance, or sun exposure by inhibiting an enzyme in the skin that produces pigment—just combine with honey to create a healing facial mask!

4.Salmon

Besides being one of the most potent sources of anti-inflammatory omega-3s, salmon also contains dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE). DMAE promotes healthy skin because it protects the integrity of cell membranes. Strengthening the cell membranes guards against their deterioration that causes premature ageing. This nutrient also helps to prevent the production of arachidonic acid (AA), an inflammation precursor that leads to wrinkle formation.

And that’s not all. DMAE works in conjunction with B vitamins to increases levels of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter essential for proper muscle functioning that can keep your face looking toned and firm.

5.Papaya

This tropical fruit contains a plethora of active enzymes which pass on their health benefits. One enzyme, chymopapain, has been used to relieve inflammation—a common source of skin conditions. And another enzyme, papain, can help remove blemishes and even treat acne when applied topically as the enzyme dissolves pore-clogging fats and cleanses the skin.

Not to mention, just a single cup of fresh, ripe papaya packs a whopping 144 per cent of your DV of collagen-strengthening vitamin C.

6.Bell Peppers

Vitamin C is essential to the formation and growth of skin and muscle tissue as well as to building collagen—the protein which provides strength and structure to your skin, bones, muscles, and tendons. But instead of grabbing an orange to get your dose, much on some vitamin C-rich yellow bell peppers instead.

7.Eggs

Here’s another reason you should eat the whole egg. The yolk is rich in vitamins that are essential for proper cell function, as well as contain the “beauty vitamin,” biotin. This B vitamin is more commonly known to help hair grow and strengthen fingernails, but research has shown it also helps protect skin from acne, rashes, and even dryness.

In addition to giving your body a dose of healthy protein that it needs, egg whites are high in both the lysine and proline (amino acids), as well as collagen itself. So adding an egg to your diet could help support your body’s natural production of collagen to help fight fine lines.

8.Detox Water

Be honest. How many products and concealers have you purchased to cover those pesky, puffy, dark circles under your the eyes? They may be a sign of lack of sleep, but it can also indicate another more common issue: dehydration. Salty foods, alcohol, exercise, hot weather and just plain not drinking enough water can create inflammation, which results in those raccoon eyes.

Start replenishing your body with these detox waters. Cut up some citrus fruits (rind included), soak in a pitcher of ice water, and drink up. The vitamin C in the citrus will help balance levels of electrolytes and expel excess water weight while the d-limonene in the rinds acts as a powerful anti-inflammatory compound which helps the liver flush toxins from the body.

9.Avocado

Avocado dip

Instead of investing in a slew of questionable anti-ageing products, head to the store and grab an avocado. The fruit is rich in monounsaturated fatty acids, which have been proven to hydrate and shield the skin by lowering the risk of premature ageing caused by ultraviolet radiation. Avocados’ potent source of fats also helps you absorb many of the fat-soluble vitamins that also help protect your skin from sun damage.

10.Green Leafy Vegetables

Popeye’s favourite veggie triumphs again. People who ate the leafiest greens had prevented squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. Researcher speculates that the high levels of folate, an essential B vitamin which helps maintain and repair DNA, in these veggies may reduce the likelihood of cancer-cell growth. Just a single cup of spinach contains 65 per cent of your DV of folate.

Similarly, kale has proven that it earned its spot as a superfood. This cruciferous veggie is loaded with the skin’s favourite anti-ageing vitamins A, C, E, and, uniquely, vitamin K. Leafy greens are one of the most potent sources of vitamin K, a vitamin which helps with blood clotting and faster healing when ingested. And when applied topically, it can minimize the visibility of bruises, scars, stretch marks, and spider veins.

11.Green Tea

Pour yourself a cup of this green elixir and watch your skin glow! Green tea contains catechins, an antioxidant with proven anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties.

This food (especially of the Matcha kind), being full of natural antioxidants, is rich in the phytonutrient known as epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and is extremely efficient in protecting your skin from the harmful free radicals that are majorly responsible for skin problems such as dark spots, premature ageing and even spots.

Since green tea also helps lower levels of dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the hormone responsible for your acne issues, it is also extremely efficient in keeping your skin clear and free from any blemishes. Just be careful to not overdo it. Too much caffeine can lead to dehydration, which may have the opposite effects on skin health.

12.Blueberries

Blueberries are one of nature’s finest superfoods. Brimming with antioxidants, blueberries help your body quash cell-damaging, skin-ageing free radicals. These berries also help boost the strength of collagen fibers thanks to their high concentration of anthocyanins: phytonutrients that give these berries their bright blue hue. Not to mention, this fruit is also a great source of prebiotics —fiber-rich foods that your gut bugs ferment into anti-inflammatory fatty acids—which can help heal your immune system and alleviate inflammation-induced skin conditions.

13.Oats

Oats

A nutrient-dense whole foods diet won’t just help you lose weight—it’ll also brighten up your skin. That’s because introducing high fiber foods like oats will feed your inflammation-reducing gut bacteria, minimize spikes in blood sugar that can contribute to skin problems, and strengthen and firm up your body tissues. That last benefit is because of oats’ high source of silicon, a trace mineral that also helps skin retain elasticity, slowing the signs of ageing.

14.Nuts

Over time, skin loses collagen and thins, which makes the veins beneath the eyes more visible. Luckily, all you have to do is grab Brazil nuts. That’s because one brazil nut has over 135 per cent of your DV of selenium, a nutrient that can boost the production of collagen. This mineral helps preserve elastin, a protein that keeps your skin smooth and tight and acts as an antioxidant, stopping free radicals created by UV exposure from damaging cells. They’re also full of vitamin E to keep your skin moisturized and copper to support the production of melanin, a compound that also protects your skin from the harmful effects of UV rays.

Almonds are full of one of the most oft-associated vitamins with skincare, vitamin E. That’s because this vitamin helps repair scarred cells and defends against sun damage. And because vitamin E also acts as an antioxidant, it also works to keep your body free of dangerous free radicals. Almonds are also one of the best sources of dairy-free calcium.

Walnuts? Didn’t come to mind. Omega-3 fatty acids can help prevent skin cancer by inhibiting the formation of the chemical COX-2. Walnuts are a prime source of healthy fat.

15. Honey

Speaking of honey, this is another ingredient that does wonders for your skin. The best snack to eat is raw honey, and the best part is that you can top it on almost any fruit. Raw honey contains five enzymes, six different vitamins, eight distinctive lipids, 12 minerals, 17 trace elements, 18 amino acids (proteins), 18 bioflavonoids (also known as antioxidants), and 26 aroma compounds, making it a special healing ingredient that works its magic inside and out.

15.Dark Chocolate

Forget the sunscreen—pack a bar of chocolate in your beach bag. That’s because the antioxidants in dark chocolate known as flavanols reduce roughness in the skin and provide sun protection. According to a study in nutrients, cocoa’s antioxidants can protect the skin from oxidative stress, which can lead to premature skin ageing. Chocolate is also a great source of pre and probiotics to help heal your gut and reduce inflammation.

16.Yogurt

Yoghurt is easily the best food for glowing skin. Most of the skin ailments that we have are caused on account of having an unhealthy stomach, bowels and gut. Yoghurt is known to contain probiotics that aid in the process of digestion, thereby ensuring that problems such as breakouts and skin dryness, do not bother your radiant flawless complexion. Consume as much yoghurt as you like, after every meal and with smoothies and fruits salads. As the Turks would say, yoghurt is the cure for absolutely everything!

It’s not an instant fix but an investment that will benefit you long—term...

By Priyanshi Bhatnagar