8 Proven Steps to Lose Weight Instead of Counting Calories + 9 My Personal Strategy

My previous article was entirely emphasised on why we should stop counting calories for overall health benefits.

But while I focused on reasons to stop counting calories and it impacts our physical and mental well being.

So, here I bring out the healthy ways of getting the result of most of your health goals naturally and holistically.

This is exactly how we should do for better longterm health.

Instead of pulling out your logbook and pens, follow these tips and you’ll naturally begin to drop weight while healing your body and satisfying hunger pangs, ensuring your belly doesn’t constantly ring the alarm that’s it’s hungry. Speaking of which, to curb your appetite quickly and easily—without diet pills or counting calorie plans—don’t miss our essential healthy eating ways.

1. Listen to your body: Notice the sensations your my body before, during, and after eating.

Think about what you eat makes you feel. Is it satisfying? Enjoyable to eat? Does it keep you full until lunch or does it leave you wanting a snack after an hour?

“For example, does the meal gives you sustained energy or do you have an energy crash?”

2. Tune in to what your body actually wants.

Healthy eating encourages you to get back in touch with your body’s own signals that tell us what to eat and when rather than relying on external cues like strict diet rules.

“Diet culture has disconnected us from our bodies and the wisdom that lies within it.” If we were to get out of our head and listen and connect to our body, we’d eat a lot differently.

3. Eat more plants and whole foods.

Fill up on foods containing fiber, healthy fats and phytonutrients like fruits, nuts, beans, virgin plant oils, non-starchy veggies, minimally processed whole grains, and fish, as well as yoghurt with live probiotics.

Cheese, eggs, poultry and unprocessed red meat can be eaten in moderation.

4. Eat fewer processed foods.

It’s best to minimize your intake of ultra-processed foods such as chips, candy, soda and packaged snack cakes — basically anything containing ingredients like artificial flavours, hydrogenated oils and emulsifiers.

5. Cook at Home more.

Take a break from those nightly takeout orders. Take-out and restaurant meals are often high in sugar, sodium and unhealthy fat — not to mention the portion sizes can be excessive. When you’re preparing your own food, however, you’re in charge of the ingredients that go into each meal to assure they align with your health goals.

6. Make a Nutrition checklist.

Make sure all the 5 major food groups have an appearance. (How many servings of fruits did you have today? Did any of your meals contain healthy fats like avocado, olive oil, or nuts?) Keep notes on how many servings of each food group you had-it’s the best way to ensure you get everything you need while avoiding empty-calorie foods.

7. Understand Meal portions.

Three ounces of meat is about the size of a deck of cards, a half cup of grains is roughly the size of your palm, and one cup of veggies is equivalent to a medium-sized fist. Stick to those approximate measurements so you don’t eat too much.

8. Follow the 80-20 rule

Because creating healthy habits takes time, be sure to leave room for error during your weight-loss journey. The idea is simple: just eat healthfully 80 per cent of the time and leave 20 per cent of the time to splurge. That way, you won’t feel guilty and stressed if you happen to nab a slice of pizza at your cousin’s backyard party.

Just try to keep the bar high on your indulgences. For example, make your own homemade desserts using quality ingredients instead of buying those packaged, processed cakes.

Here are my 9 personal things I do instead of counting calories:

1. I always eat when I’m hungry.

2. I eat foods that I’m actually in the mood to eat.

3. I put my full attention on the meal in front of me.

4. I sit down when I eat.

5. I chew every bite before taking another.

6. I enjoy the flavours, texture, mouthfeel, sounds, richness, crunchiness or softness, saltiness or sweetness.

7. I make an effort to eat healthy foods and make an equal effort to eat the healthy foods that taste good to me.

8. I sometimes choose to eat foods purely for the please of eating them, even when they are not “healthy”.

9. I sometimes choose to eat more food than is comfortable, either because the food tastes really good or because I know I won’t have time to eat again for a while (such as during a busy workday).

It’s empowering to know that your body knows best. It validates all of those signals your body sends you a moment to moment, even the urge to eat a little something extra at the end of a meal.

Now before you go, I’d love to hear your opinion in the comments below.

Published by Priyanshi Bhatnagar, Founder of Detoxpri

Hi, I'm Priyanshi! As a Holistic Nutritionist and as a leading voice in mindful nutrition, my purpose is to teach you how to take care of yourself using simple sustainable mindful eating and living practices so you feel empowered, balanced, and at ease. In my teachings, you'll learn both the science of nutrition and the art of healthy eating so you design a way of to eat for healthy mind, body & soul that's unique to you. At detoxpri, the meaning of good health is a combination of nutrition and fitness, which are essential to your well-being.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: